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Descriptive Text (ESSAY)

(TASK 1 DRAFT 1)

 DESCRIPTIVE TEXT

Self-Identity

I am Yosep Papuanus Iyai, I was born on April 21st, 1994 in Nabire Papua. My religion is catholic. I live at Dormitory of Lampung University in Bandar Lampung.

My father is an officer, and he is still occupying as a regent of nabire regence, and my mother is a housewife. I have four sisters, and three brothers. My first sister is a doctor at a general houspital in Jayapura. She graduated from one of well-known college in Papua namely Cendrawasih University, and at this time she is still working as a doctor. My second sister is an english teacher at SMA N 05 Nabire in Papua, the school which I have ever graduated. Then my third brother is still taking his master philosophy dagree at University of Monash in Melbourn Australia. Meanwhile my forth sister is still studying at Oxford University in England as under graduate student, she is taking political-science department, then my fifth sister is still studying at faculty of medicine Cendrawasi University in Jayapura. Then my youngest brother is still at second grade of Junior High school.

I graduated from SDN 1 Bomomani  in 2007. At the same time I continued my study to SMP 05 Nabire. After graduating from Junior High School in 2009, I continued my study at Senior High School then I got graduation in 2012; furthermore, I continued my study at Mandarin Department Faculty of Teacher-Training and Education Cendrawasih University. At the second semester I quit from this college and now I have been studying in english department, the Faculty of Teacher-Training and education in Lampung University through local government’s educational program. My daily activities that I always do day by day since I came in Lampung is rather different than when I was in Papua, but at least what I used to be is a part of my life; thus, I am still holding some of my habitual actions, eventhough I am living in distinct area with Papua. In the morning at six o c’lock more than one hour I always walk and run around the football field in order to maintain my  health, after that I prepare myself before going to campus. I usually go to campus at 07.30 in the morning; nevertheless not everyday I go to the campus because it bases on the schedule. The type of transportation that I always use to going campus is motorcycle, and I always finish my lecture day by day before six pm. After arriving in the Dormitory I usually take a couple of minutes and play football in football field of Unila .

Everyday if I have a slightly spare time occasionally I go with my buddy Fajri Abdillah at his boarding house and working our assignments together. Besides doing the tasks with Fajri Abdillah, sometimes I also spend my spare time to go to the library of Lampung University, and collect some books that related to the subject that I got in the previous time, such as reading course, linguistics, phonology, morphology, and etc. In addition, I also now and then spend a little of my spare time by reading novel, like Harry Potter about The Chamber of Secret. Besides that I also usually read some comics, such as Naruto, Tom and Jerry, Mr.Bean, Avatar the legend of Corra, etc. Meanwhile the most important of my daily activity is getting prayer every morning and afternoon at the exactly time at six oc’lock, this is a very faithful actifity for me, so I always do it consecutively. On Saturday I have free-full time because Saturday is holyday; moreover, on that day I always have an engrossing weekend, so specially for Saturday I have a very specialized-schedule on this enticing day. In the moorning, I always bicycle with my bike mates and we start for biking at seven to nine a.m. I spend more than three hours. I and my bike mates usually start for biking from the dormitory and turn around the football field of Unila; furthermore, we continue to bicycle again around of the every faculty of this Lampung University.

I have some hobbies such as, playing footbal in the football field of Unila, and my second hobby is watching movie like horror movie, action movie, historical movie, and Hollywood published movie. However the most category of movies that I like is horror movie, like black death, vampire, cannibal, holyface and the other horror movies. Furthermore my other hobbies are playing music, travelling, hiking and writing short novel

Everyone has a certain aim or goal in enliving this life. for me life comes only once, thus my target of life is I must become a person who will make our beloved country Indonesia better in the future by preparing future-generation, it means that after graduating from this university I will try to take master dagree at any particular college; furthermore, I will reach for the best university of the world, like Oxford or Harvad University. After that I will come back to my beloved country Inodonesia and more specially to Papua in order that I will teach a certain college in Papua. As to my marriage in the future, I will marry the lady who has the same religion with me, and my motivation word is doing whatever you can as long as I live.

REVISED VERSION

(TASK 1 DRAFT 2)

DESCRIPTIVE TEXT (ESSAY)

Self-Identity

I am Yosep Papuanus Iyai, I was born on April, 21st, 1994 in Nabire province of Papua. I am 20 years old. My religion is catholic. Now I live in Lampung city.

My father is an officer, and he is still occupying as a regent of nabire regence, and my mother is a housewife. I have four sisters, and three brothers. My first sister is a doctor at a general houspital in Jayapura. She graduated from one of well-known college in Papua namely Cendrawasih University, and at this time she has been working as a doctor. My second sister is an english teacher at SMA N 05 Nabire in Papua, the school which I have ever graduated. Then my third brother is still taking his master philosophy dagree at University of Monash in Melbourn Australia. Meanwhile my forth sister is still studying at Oxford University in England as under graduate student, she is taking political-science department, then my fifth sister is still studying at faculty of medicine Cendrawasi University in Jayapura. Then my youngest brother is still at second grade of High Junior school.

I graduated from SDN 1 Bomomani  in 2007. At the same time I continued my study to SMP 05 Nabire. After graduating from Junior High School in 2009, I continued my study at Senior High School then I got graduation in 2012; furthermore, I continued my study at Mandarin Department Faculty of Teacher-Training and Education Cendrawasih University. At the second semester I quit from this college and now I have been studying in english department, the Faculty of Teacher-Training and education in Lampung University. I got here through local government’s educational program. My daily activities that I always do day by day since I came in Lampung is rather different than when I was in Papua, but at least what I used to be is a part of my life; thus, I am still holding some of my habitual actions, eventhough I am living in distinct area with Papua. In the morning at six o c’lock more than one hour I always walk and run around the football field in order to maintain my  health, after that I prepare myself before going to campus. I usually go to campus at 07.30 in the morning; nevertheless not everyday I go to the campus because it bases on the schedule. The type of transportation that I always use to going campus is motorcycle, and I always finish my lecture day by day before six pm. After arriving in the Dormitory I usually take a couple of minutes and play football in football field of Unila .

Everyday if I have a slightly spare time occasionally I go with my buddy Fajri Abdillah at his boarding house and work our assignments together. Besides doing the tasks with Fajri Abdillah, sometimes I also spend my spare time to go to the library of Lampung University, and collect some books that related to the subject that I got in the previous time, such as reading course, linguistics, phonology, morphology, and etc. In addition, I also now and then spend a little of my spare time by reading novel, like Harry Potter about The Chamber of Secret. Besides that I also usually read some comics, such as Naruto, Tom and Jerry, Mr.Bean, Avatar the legend of Corra, etc. Meanwhile the most important of my daily activity is getting prayer every morning and afternoon at the exactly time at six oc’lock, this is a very faithful actifity for me, so I always do it consecutively. On Saturday I have free-full time because Saturday is holyday; moreover, on that day I always have an engrossing weekend, so specially for Saturday I have a very specialized-schedule on this enticing day. In the moorning, I always bicycle with my bike mates and we start for biking at seven to nine a.m. I spend more than three hours. I and my bike mates usually start for biking from the dormitory and turn around the football field of Unila; furthermore, we continue to bicycle again around of the every faculty of this Lampung University.

I have some hobbies such as, playing footbal in the football field of Unila, and my second hobby is watching movie like horror movie, action movie, historical movie, and Hollywood published movie. However the most category of movies that I like is horror movie, like black death, vampire, cannibal, holyface and the other horror movies. Furthermore my other hobbies are playing music, travelling, hiking and writing short novel

Everyone has a certain aim or goal in enliving this life. for me life comes only once, thus my target of life is I must become a person who will make our beloved country Indonesia better in the future by preparing future-generation, it means that after graduating from this university I will try to take master dagree at any particular college; furthermore, I will reach for the best university of the world, like Oxford or Harvad University. After that I will come back to my beloved country Inodonesia and more specially to Papua in order that I will teach a certain college in Papua. As to my marriage in the future, I will marry the lady who has the same religion with me, and my motivation word is doing whatever you can as long as I live.

 

 

(Lampung University, ED 2013)
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Simple Strategies Academics can Use to Help Students Improve Their Writing Skills

by John M. Malouff, PhD, JD, Sally E. Rooke, BA Hons. Psych., & Nicola S. Schutte, PhD

Model for Improving Student Writing Skills:

Academics can help students improve their writing skills by (a) increasing student motivation to have good writing skills, (b) providing instruction in writing processes and rules, (c) providing writing practice, and (d) providing constructive feedback about the students’ writing. With high motivation, students will find ways to improve their writing and will persist in the effort. To write well, students need to apply appropriate processes, such as starting early, and to apply the rules of writing, such as grammar rules. Writing practice helps most when students receive clear, specific feedback about what to do the same and what to do differently in the future.

Specific Strategies for Improving Student Writing Skills:

These strategies are organised according to the order in which an academic might implement them.  Following each strategy is a word that describes whether the strategy targets motivation, instruction, practice, or feedback.

1. Emphasise to students that good writing skills are important, both to their satisfactory completion of the unit and to their future careers. Encourage students to improve their writing skills.  (Motivation)

2. Provide students with an anecdote about the implications of substandard writing or the value of good writing. For example, you may talk about a job candidate who missed selection due to his or her poor writing.  (Motivation)

3. Read aloud quality writing done by a former student, and encourage students to listen to its flow. With the permission of the writer, name and praise him or her.  (Motivation, Instruction)

4. Encourage students to pay close attention to the grammar and punctuation they see in textbooks and other books and articles, as well as in any sample paper.  (Instruction)

5. Encourage students to complete a writing unit, such as ENCO 100 at the University of New England (UNE).  (Instruction)

6. Refer students to writing skills web sites. UNE’s Academic Skills Office provides useful fact sheets.  (Instruction)

7. Explain to students that certain writing skills are fundamental to almost all types of writing, but there are also purpose-specific writing skills and styles. (Instruction)

8. Tell students: With practice and feedback on performance, writing becomes better. Learning most complex skills involves many attempts; students need not feel discouraged if they are not instantly accomplished writers in a specific genre. Once a certain level of skill has been reached, the process of writing becomes increasingly enjoyable.  (Motivation)

9. Describe to students the process you use to write journal articles and reports and how using the process benefits you. This process might include starting with an outline, completing several drafts of the document, checking the writing against the requirements, and asking another individual to proofread the document.  (Motivation, Instruction)

10. Give students handouts containing important writing rules. “The Writer’s Workplace” by Sandra and John Scarry, the “Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association,” both available at the UNE Library, and web sites with content such as UNE’s writing fact sheets are good sources of concise rules regarding grammar and punctuation.  (Instruction)

11. Teach students one important rule relating to grammar or punctuation in each lecture or in each unit. (Instruction)

12. Give students a course-related worksheet, have them write a précis of its content, and then ask them to critique each other’s writing.  (Practice, Feedback)

13. Toward the end of a lecture, ask students to spend five minutes writing a summary of the content of the lecture. Next, have students critique each other’s writing.  (Practice, Feedback)

14. Give a writing assignment and in the marking criteria set aside a specific number of points for writing quality. Give students a copy of the marking criteria before they begin writing.  (Practice, Motivation)

15. Explain to students before they complete a writing assignment the most common writing errors made in the past as well as the rules the errors violate.  (Instruction)

16. Provide students with a list of poorly structured sentences from assignments of prior years. Ask the students to improve the sentences, and then discuss the improvements as a class. (Practice, Feedback)

17. Provide students with a checklist of writing-process suggestions (e.g., see item 9 above) they can apply to a written assignment. Ask them to submit a completed checklist with the assignment.  (Instruction)

18. To the extent feasible, correct writing errors on student papers and provide printed statements of important rules violated by the errors.  (Feedback, Instruction)

19. Encourage students to learn the rules they violated in making the errors.  (Instruction)

20. Praise students freely for excellent or improved writing.  (Motivation)

Strategy Sources: Some of the ideas are ours. Other sources include Dr Einar Thorsteinsson, Dr Sue Watt, Sam Bjone, and Liz Temple of the UNE School of Psychology; UNE Academic Skills Office staff; and the following writing skills textbook and web sites:

Davis, B. G. (2002).  Helping students write better in all courses.

Murray, D. M. (1985). A writer teaches writing (2nd ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

University of Wisconsin, Whitewater, School of Graduate Studies and Continuing Education (2006). Efficient ways to improve student writing.

Helping Young Children Develop Strong Writing Skills

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Note: This article was adapted from two articles written by the U.S. Department of Education, and was compiled by Colorín Colorado. The article refers to the child in the female gender, but all activities and suggestions apply to both genders.

Writing is an important part of our daily lives. It is, however, a difficult skill to learn and master. By getting a head start with some simple activities, you can help your child begin to develop her writing skills at an early age. By doing so you will be contributing to her future success as a student and as an adult while teaching her how to express herself.

In this article, we provide some reasons that writing is an important skill for people of all ages, as well as a list of suggestions that will help your child become a stronger writer.

Why is writing important?

Writing is practical.
Every day, we need to write in order to complete our tasks, whether we are filling out a form at the doctor’s office or writing an important letter. These tasks require us to write clearly, and organize information effectively.

Writing is an important element of a student’s education.
Whether students are writing by hand or on the computer, many assignments and exams require students to write short answers or longer essays as a way of assessing what they have learned. As students get older, they will be expected to show more sophisticated writing skills, and to complete more sophisticated tasks through their writing. In addition, many colleges and universities require students to write essays as part of their admissions application.

Writing can be an important element of an employee’s job.
Employees in many kinds of jobs are required to write on a daily basis. Perhaps they are taking phone messages and doing administrative work, or writing research reports and newspaper articles. Whatever the task, their ability to do their job well may depend on their ability to write. Many job applicants also must submit a resumé and a letter of application when applying to a new job.

Writing is an important form of communication.
Writing letters and emails is a common way of keeping in touch with our friends, relatives, and professional colleagues. Writing is frequently the final stage in communication when we want to leave no room for doubt, which is why we write and sign contracts, leases, and treaties when we make important decisions.

Writing can be an important outlet.
Many people find writing to be therapeutic, and a helpful way to express feelings that cannot be expressed so easily by speaking.

What Can You Do?

It’s important to remember that writing can be as difficult a subject to teach and assess as it is to learn. Many students have trouble writing with clarity, coherence, and organization, and this can discourage them from writing if they feel frustrated.

That’s where parent involvement can make a big difference. Encouraging your child to develop strong writing skills at a young age, and to become a better writer as she gets older, can have a lifelong positive impact on her writing, and may make writing an easier and more enjoyable process for her

To get you started, the Department of Education offers a number of ideas of things you can do help your child become a stronger writer. While many of these ideas apply to younger children, they can be adapted for older children as well. To learn more about ways to support your children if they continue to struggle with writing in middle and high school, read Tips for Parents of Struggling Adolescent Writers.

Ideas for Parents: How to Help Your Child Become a Stronger Writer

What You Need

  • Pencils, crayons, or markers
  • Yarn or ribbon
  • Writing paper or notebook
  • Cardboard or heavy paper
  • Construction paper
  • Safety scissors

Before getting started

Provide a place
It’s important for your child to have a good place to write, such as a desk or table with a smooth, flat surface. It’s also crucial to have good lighting.

Provide the materials
Provide plenty of paper (lined and unlined) and things to write with, including pencils, pens, and crayons.

Brainstorm
Talk with your child as much as possible about her ideas and impressions, and encourage her to describe people and events to you.

Activities for young children

Encourage the child to draw and to discuss her drawings
Ask your child questions about her drawings such as:

“What is the boy doing?”

“Does the house look like ours?”

“Can you tell a story about this picture?”

Show an interest in, and ask questions about, the things your child says, draws, and may try to write.

Ask your child to tell you simple stories as you write them down
Copy the story as your child tells it, without making changes. Ask her to clarify anything you don’t understand.

Encourage your child to write her name
Practice writing her name with her, and point out the letters in her name when you see them in other places (on signs, in stores, etc.). She may start by only writing the first few letters of her name, but soon the rest will follow.

Use games
There are numerous games and puzzles that help children with spelling while increasing their vocabulary. Some of these may include crossword puzzles, word games, anagrams, and cryptograms designed especially for children. Flash cards are fun to use too, and they’re easy to make at home.

Turn your child’s writing into books
Paste her drawings and writings on pieces of construction paper. For each book, make a cover out of heavier paper or cardboard, and add special art, a title, and her name as author. Punch holes in the pages and cover, and bind the book together with yarn or ribbon.

Day-to-Day Activities

Make sure your child sees you writing
She will learn about writing by watching you write. Talk with her about your writing so that she begins to understand why writing is important and the many ways it can be used.

Encourage your child to write, even if she’s scribbling
Give your child opportunities to practice writing by helping her sign birthday cards, write stories, and make lists.

As your child gets older, write together
Have your child help you with the writing you do, including writing letters, shopping lists, and messages.

Suggest note-taking
Encourage your child to take notes on trips or outings, and to describe what she saw. This could include a description of nature walks, a boat ride, a car trip, or other events that lend themselves to note-taking.

Encourage copying
If your child likes a particular song, suggest that she learn the words by writing them down. Also encourage copying favorite poems or quotations from books and plays.

Encourage your child to read her stories out loud
As your child gets older, ask her to share her stories with you. Listen carefully without interrupting, and give her positive feedback about her ideas and her writing!

Hang a family message board in the kitchen
Offer to write notes there for your child. Be sure that she finds notes left there for her.

Help your child write letters and emails to relatives and friends
These may include thank you notes or just a special note to say hello. Be sure to send your child a letter or card once in awhile too so that she is reminded of how special it is to get a letter in the mail. Consider finding a pen pal for your child.

Encourage keeping a journal
This is excellent writing practice as well as a good outlet for venting feelings. Encourage your child to write about things that happen at home and school, about people she likes or dislikes and why, and about things she wants to remember and do. If she wants to share the journal with you, read the entries and discuss them together.

Things to remember

Allow time
Help your child spend time thinking about a writing project or exercise. Good writers often spend a lot of time thinking, preparing, and researching before starting to write. Your child may dawdle, sharpen a pencil, get papers ready, or look up the spelling of a word. Be patient — this may all be part of her preparation.

Respond to your child’s writing
Respond to the ideas your child expresses verbally or in writing. Make it clear that you are interested in what the writing conveys, which means focusing on “what” the child has written rather than “how” it was written. It’s usually wise to ignore minor errors, particularly at the stage when your child is just getting ideas together.

Praise your child’s writing
Take a positive approach and find good things to say about your child’s writing. Is it accurate? Descriptive? Original? Creative? Thoughtful? Interesting?

Avoid writing for your child
Don’t write a paper for your child that will be turned in as her work, and don’t rewrite your child’s work. Meeting a writing deadline, taking responsibility for the finished product, and feeling ownership of it are also important parts of the writing process.

Help your child with her writing as she gets older
Ask your child questions that will help her clarify the details of her stories and assignments as they get longer, and help her organize her thoughts. Talk about the objective of what she is writing.

Provide your child with spelling help when she’s ready for it
When your child is just learning how to read and write, she may try different ways to write and spell. Our job is to encourage our children’s writing so they will enjoy putting their thoughts and ideas on paper. At first, your child may begin to write words the way that she hears them. For example, she might write “haf” instead of “have”, “frn” instead of “friend”, and “Frd” instead of “Fred.” This actually is a positive step in developing her phonemic awareness. Keep practicing with her, and model the correct spelling of words when you write. As your child gets older and begins to ask more questions about letters and spelling, provide her with the help she needs.

Practice, practice, practice
Writing well takes lots of practice, so make sure your child doesn’t get discouraged too easily. It’s not easy! Give her plenty of opportunities to practice so that she has the opportunity to improve.

Read together
Reading and writing support each other. The more your child does of each, the better she will be at both. Reading can also stimulate your child to write about her own family or school life. If your child has a particular favorite story or author, ask her why she thinks that story or that person’s writing is special.

As you read and write more with your child, you will be building an important foundation, and taking steps that will help your child to become a better reader, writer, and student. Your efforts now will make a difference — and it may be just the difference that your child needs to succeed!

References

U.S. Department of Education. Office of Educational Research and Improvement, Archived Information. “Help Your Child Learn to Write Well.” http://www.ed.gov/pubs/parents/Writing/index.html.

U.S. Department of Education. Parent Section: Helping Your Child Become a Reader. “Write On!” http://www.ed.gov/parents/academic/help/reader/part5.html#write.

Tips to Help Build Your Child’s Writing Skills

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Writing in Today’s Classroom

Writing helps communicate thoughts, complete tasks and demonstrate the mastery of a skill. It is an integral part of every elementary school student’s education. In fact, with the adoption of the Common Core Standards, students are using their writing skills even more than before across the curriculum. No longer is writing taught as a stand-alone topic; rather, it is now integrated into all core academic areas. Here are some examples of where your child may encounter writing tasks:

  • Students may be given a math problem and they are expected to explain in writing how they solved it.
  • Science tests may involve a few multiple choice questions followed by a two-page essay question.
  • During reading instruction, students may be asked to look back into the text and use specific details from the passage to support their reading comprehension writing assignment.

Writing is not an easy task for all students. For many struggling writers, these assignments and assessments may leave students frustrated and discouraged. It is challenging to put thoughts into words on a page in an organized manner. Parents can support and enrich their children’s writing skills in the home environment. This support may help make the task of writing easier and more enjoyable for students.

Tips for Building Writing Skills at Home:

1. Provide a variety of materials for writing. Fun pens and pretty papers can be a great motivational tool.

2. Create a space in your home for writing that is free from distractions.

3. Choose strong vocabulary words to learn at home for the week. Use these words in your daily oral vocabulary and written work. Words such as “obstacles” and “curious” are a great start. See if your child can use them both in a written story.

4. Integrate core academic area writing at home. Do a science project together and then write about the process or results.

5. Encourage writing for a variety of purposes. Your child could make a shopping list, write a fictional story or send a letter.

6. Use technology to improve writing. Encourage your child to send an e-mail to a friend or publish a story online with a program such as Little Bird Tales.

7. Allow your child to observe you writing on your own. Be a good role model and smile while you are doing it, too! Take time to share your writing with him or her and talk about how you use writing in your personal and professional life. Show a variety of different written work such as a written letter, business communication or journal page.

8. Connect writing with your child’s passion. If your son is interested in the Magic Tree House series of books, encourage him to write a letter to Mary Pope Osborne. If your daughter is interested in mysteries, have her create a scavenger hunt with written clues to find a hidden treasure.

9. Celebrate writing in a variety of ways. You could:

– Host a family “open mic” night once a month and take turns reading poems or stories written by family members out loud.

– Tape completed stories to the refrigerator.

– Do a happy dance together with your child when a completed writing project comes home from school with a positive note.

10. Last, but not least, it is important to provide time to write daily. In order for writing skills to improve, students must spend time writing. Add it to your family’s daily routine and build it into the schedule. This will help your writer to practice and gain confidence in his or her writing.